The timely and accurate diagnosis of suspicious cases is a key part of controlling the 2019-nCoV outbreak. Meanwhile the development of vaccines and antibodies is urgently needed too. To speed up the detection and therapeutic research of this novel coronavirus, we synthesized the genes that can be used as positive control for the detection of 2019-nCoV by RT-PCR, genes encoding the surface glycoprotein and nucleocapsid phosphoprotein of 2019-nCoV, and Homo sapiens angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) for vaccine and antibody development. All the plasmids are in stock now and can be shipped out immediately once ordered!

Cat. No. Plasmid Name Description Price Ordering
MC_0101076 pUC57-2019-nCoV-PC:RdRP This plasmid contains part of 2019-nCoV RdRP gene and can be used as positive control for the detection of 2019-nCoV by RT-PCR $85 Add To Cart
MC_0101077 pUC57-2019-nCoV-PC:N This plasmid contains part of 2019-nCoV N gene and can be used as positive control for the detection of 2019-nCoV by RT-PCR $85 Add To Cart
MC_0101078 pUC57-2019-nCoV-PC:E This plasmid contains part of 2019-nCoV E gene and can be used as positive control for the detection of 2019-nCoV by RT-PCR $85 Add To Cart
MC_0101079 pUC57-2019-nCoV-PC:ORF1ab This plasmid contains part of 2019-nCoV ORF1ab and can be used as positive control for the detection of 2019-nCoV by RT-PCR $85 Add To Cart
MC_0101080 pUC57-2019-nCoV-S(Original) This plasmid contains the encoding gene of 2019-nCoV surface glycoprotein (original sequence) $420 Add To Cart
MC_0101081 pUC57-2019-nCoV-S(Human) This plasmid contains the encoding gene of 2019-nCoV surface glycoprotein (Codon optimized for Human expression system) $420 Add To Cart
MC_0101082 pUC57-2019-nCoV-S(E. coli) This plasmid contains the encoding gene of 2019-nCoV surface glycoprotein (Codon optimized for E. Coli expression system) $420 Add To Cart
MC_0101083 pUC57-2019-nCoV-S(CHO) This plasmid contains the encoding gene of 2019-nCoV surface glycoprotein (Codon optimized for CHO expression system) $420 Add To Cart
MC_0101084 pUC57-2019-nCoV-S(Insect) This plasmid contains the encoding gene of 2019-nCoV surface glycoprotein (Codon optimized for Insect expression system) $420 Add To Cart
MC_0101085 pUC57-2019-nCoV-N This plasmid contains the encoding gene of 2019-nCoV nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (original sequence) $140 Add To Cart
MC_0101086 pcDNA3.1+/C-(K)DYK-ACE2 (NM_021804.2, OHu20260) Homo sapiens angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the receptor for 2019-nCoV $379 Add To Cart

Plasmids Used for 2019-nCoV Research Are Shared by Cloud Scientist


We sincerely thank Dr. Haisheng Yu for sharing his newly constructed plasmids with the community!

Proteins Used for 2019-nCoV Research

Protein Name System Purity Unit Price (USD)** Timeline***
2019-nCoV* N Protein Insect 90% Insect NP-His Unit Price In stock product,
next-day shipping;
Customized service,
2 weeks.
0.5mg $1,000
1mg $1,500
1.5mg $2,000
2mg $2,500
Functional 2019-nCoV* S protein(RBD) Insect 90% Insect RBD-His Unit price In stock product,
next-day shipping;
Customized service,
2 weeks.
0.5mg $1,000
1.0mg $1,500
1.5mg $2,000
2.0mg $2,500
Mammalian 90% Get a quote 2 weeks.
2019-nCoV* S protein(ECD His-tagged) Insect & Mammalian 85% Get a quote 2 weeks.

* 2019-nCoV is also also known as SARS-CoV-2.

** Please email the request to Plasmid@genscript.com. Our service representative will contact you with a quote shortly.

*** Shipping time excluded.

2019-nCoV qRT-PCR Detection Assay


To help expedite 2019-nCoV research, GenScript’s R&D team developed a qRT PCR detection assay based on GenBank Sequence NC_045512.2. This assay has successfully detected 2019-nCoV in positive control samples RdRP gene, N gene and E gene.

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How to detect the 2019 novel coronavirus?

By Gloria Han, Huimin Fang, GenScript               January 23, 2020


Figure from: Cryo-EM image of
BetaCoV2019-2020.Courtesy:
IVDC, China CDC

On January 21, 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported the first case in the United States of the new coronavirus emerged in Wuhan, China last month. The arrival of new SARS-like coronavirus in U.S. heightens concerns about global spread after the infection cases reported in Thailand, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. Meanwhile, a panel of Chinese health experts confirmed that the new virus is able to spread between people, which indicates it could be much harder to control.

Via next generation sequencing (NGS) of cultured virus or samples from several pneumonia patients, the etiologic agent responsible for the pneumonia cases in Wuhan has been identified as a novel betacoronavirus (in the same family as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV). Electron microscopy revealed the virus is a coronavirus with a characteristic crown morphology.

The genome sequence of this betacoronavirus is crucial to develop specific diagnostic tests and to identify potential intervention options. Full genome sequence data from the viruses have been released and are available on NCBI (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/MN908947 ). Working directly from sequence information, a few laboratories developed several genetic amplification (PCR) assays to detect the novel coronaviruses. A few diagnostic kits developed by commercial companies, using the real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay have been put to use rapidly. The timely emergence of detection methods is also one reason for the sharp rise in the number of confirmed cases.

Principle of novel coronavirus detection

The virus detection method can be basically illustrated as below.

Step 1:

Isolate the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) from the patients and sequence its genome.

Step 2:

Compare the genome sequence of 2019-nCoV with human genome to find out the specific sequence in the virus genome.

Step 3:

Design PCR amplification primers and fluorescent probe primers for detecting the specific sequences identified in step 2.

Step 4:

Extract RNA from suspected individual’s serum, and convert the RNA into cDNA. The cDNA is then used as template and mixed with the PCR primers and probes for amplification. If the fluorescence signal increases rapidly and Ct value is less than 37, it can be determined as positive; If there’s no fluorescence detected, or the fluorescence signal grows slowly and Ct value finally ends up above 40, it can be determined as negative.


Resources

WHO guidance

On 17 January 2020, WHO provided interim guidance to laboratories and stakeholders involved in laboratory testing of patients who meet suspected case of pneumonia associated with the 2019 novel coronavirus.

Available protocols

Here are some protocols already have some degree of validation for laboratories wishing to test for coronavirus. It is strongly recommended to contact the protocol provider institution if you have any questions, or unusual lab findings.